Captain’s log

Just when I thought Lake Erie walleye fishing couldn’t get any better, I was reminded a few short months ago that, indeed, it will, and for a number of years into the future. That’s not my prediction, that’s included in some rather exciting news (if you are a fisherman) from the Ohio Division of Wildlife. After spending the summer months surveying the Western and Central Basins of our big lake state biologists came away amazed and perhaps a little startled at how many new young-of-the-year walleye and yellow perch were added through natural spawning in 2019. That was a big “WOW!” from your captain who just completed another record season (and following a fabulous season in 2018) where many limits of walleye were caught by anglers - young and old alike- from May to September. My only disappointment is in the quality of yellow perch and smallmouth bass populations that have declined in recent years. But there is even some hope for the future in these latest findings by our fisheries scientists. This past season saw many walleyes in the 2-3 pound range on average. I expect some growth over the winter and by summer those fish will be closer to 3-4 pounder. That’s going to make for some pretty exciting, rod-bending action. I can just see it now when my younger customers battle a hefty eyes into the net. Gott love that scene. HERE’S WHAT THE STATE SAYS: Preliminary results from surveys in the western basin of Lake Erie indicate more great news for Ohio anglers, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) Division of Wildlife. For the second straight year, Ohio’s data points to an exceptional walleye hatch, the second-highest in the history of the survey, and the yellow perch hatch was also strong, well above its long-term average. Each year in August, wildlife agencies from Ohio, Ontario, and Michigan sample the western basin of Lake Erie in search of young-of-the-year walleye and yellow perch. Biologists from the Division of Wildlife survey nearly 40 locations between Toledo and Huron. The data is compared with the results from previous years to gauge the success of the walleye and yellow perch hatches. The Division of Wildlife’s 2019 August walleye hatch i ndex was 143. This is the second-highest value on record for Ohio’s waters of the western basin and far above the 20-year index average of 27. This year’s outstanding hatch combined with the excellent 2015 and 2018 year-classes will ensure an abundance of young walleye to complement the older and larger fish that make up the current Lake Erie walleye population. The August survey found the 2019 yellow perch hatch index to be very good at 467. This is above Ohio’s western basin 20-year index average of 317 and is the fifth year in the past seven that falls above the average. This above-average yellow perch hatch will help bolster the population following a strong 2018 hatch in the western basin. Additionally, catches of yearling yellow perch were nearly double the 20-year average and confirm the strength of last year’s class. During the upcoming months, Ohio survey results will be combined with Ontario data to characterize the basin-wide catches of young-of-year walleye and yellow perch. This data allows biologists to calculate an initial projection of how many young fish will enter the fishable population two years later, which will be used in the process to determine jurisdictional quotas for the 2021 fishing season. Call me at 440-365-9932 or 440-610-1932
Smallmouth bass are abundant in Lake Erie and are a thrill to catch because of their fighting and jumping abilities.
Mega Bites Charters
At Vermilion, Ohio

The 2019 Lake Erie fishing season was one for the books

Capt. Tony Denslow with a fresh caught Lake Erie walleye
Smallmouth bass are abundant in Lake Erie and are a thrill to catch because of their fighting and jumping abilities.
No, it wasn’t a river fish, just showing off back at the dock.

Captain’s log

Just when I thought Lake Erie walleye fishing couldn’t get any better, I was reminded a few short months ago that, indeed, it will, and for a number of years into the future. That’s not my prediction, that’s included in some rather exciting news (if you are a fisherman) from the Ohio Division of Wildlife. After spending the summer months surveying the Western and Central Basins of our big lake state biologists came away amazed and perhaps a little startled at how many new young-of-the-year walleye and yellow perch were added through natural spawning in 2019. That was a big “WOW!” from your captain who just completed another record season (and following a fabulous season in 2018) where many limits of walleye were caught by anglers - young and old alike- from May to September. My only disappointment is in the quality of yellow perch and smallmouth bass populations that have declined in recent years. But there is even some hope for the future in these latest findings by our fisheries scientists. This past season saw many walleyes in the 2-3 pound range on average. I expect some growth over the winter and by summer those fish will be closer to 3-4 pounder. That’s going to make for some pretty exciting, rod-bending action. I can just see it now when my younger customers battle a hefty eyes into the net. Gott love that scene. HERE’S WHAT THE STATE SAYS: Preliminary results from surveys in the western basin of Lake Erie indicate more great news for Ohio anglers, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) Division of Wildlife. For the second straight year, Ohio’s data points to an exceptional walleye hatch, the second-highest in the history of the survey, and the yellow perch hatch was also strong, well above its long-term average. Each year in August, wildlife agencies from Ohio, Ontario, and Michigan sample the western basin of Lake Erie in search of young-of-the-year walleye and yellow perch. Biologists from the Division of Wildlife survey nearly 40 locations between Toledo and Huron. The data is compared with the results from previous years to gauge the success of the walleye and yellow perch hatches. The Division of Wildlife’s 2019 August walleye hatch i ndex was 143. This is the second-highest value on record for Ohio’s waters of the western basin and far above the 20-year index average of 27. This year’s outstanding hatch combined with the excellent 2015 and 2018 year-classes will ensure an abundance of young walleye to complement the older and larger fish that make up the current Lake Erie walleye population. The August survey found the 2019 yellow perch hatch index to be very good at 467. This is above Ohio’s western basin 20-year index average of 317 and is the fifth year in the past seven that falls above the average. This above-average yellow perch hatch will help bolster the population following a strong 2018 hatch in the western basin. Additionally, catches of yearling yellow perch were nearly double the 20-year average and confirm the strength of last year’s class. During the upcoming months, Ohio survey results will be combined with Ontario data to characterize the basin-wide catches of young-of-year walleye and yellow perch. This data allows biologists to calculate an initial projection of how many young fish will enter the fishable population two years later, which will be used in the process to determine jurisdictional quotas for the 2021 fishing season. Call me at 440-365-9932 or 440-610-1932
Mega Bites Charters